Peer feedback

Peer feedback from IDQSummit 2014

Alan Duncan

The two most consistent themes throughout the summit were the importance of context and the impact on/of people. The ultimate message is that data professionals of all kinds need to focus more on the latter, in order to increase the integrity of the former.

All in all an excellent event – informative, thought-provoking and fun.

See more at http://blogs.gartner.com/alan-duncan/2014/10/15/international-data-quality-summit-context-is-crucial-but-people-are-paramount/

Ronald Damhof

I had a great time listening to my peers and talking shop over beers and good food. Learned a lot and I hope some people learned something from me.

See more at: http://prudenza.typepad.com/dwh/2014/10/iaidq-data-quality-objectivism-versus-subjectivism.html#sthash.ALaWhRBH.dpuf

Jie Wu, Informatica

The agenda was fully packed. Over 40 sessions were launched during the two-day main conference period.

As a first timer for IDQ Summit, I found it refreshing to meet other data quality professional and hear their stories, it is also reaffirming that many of the practitioners  in this space share similar views as we at Informatica has been advocating.  The consensus on the importance of quality information will help increase the adoption of data quality tools and drive the development of true data –drive culture in many organizations. Data alone has little value, only the data that meets the quality requirement becomes real asset.

See more at http://blogs.informatica.com/perspectives/2014/10/14/highlights-of-a-data-quality-love-fest-idq-summit-2014/

Nicola Askham

I flew to Richmond, Virginia to join the International Data Quality Summit — [an] excellent event[s] and gave me the opportunity to meet in person some data friends that until then had only been “virtual” friends via the wonders of social media.

It bears out something that I taught on one of my tutorials this week – the importance of building relationships and rapport with your stakeholders (especially your Data Owners and Data Stewards).  Sending an email asking them to be a Data Owner is unlikely to be successful, but meeting them face to face and explaining what data governance is and why you think they should be a data owner will be much more successful.  Especially when you take the time to get to know them and the challenges that they are facing, so that you can articulate what being a Data Owner will mean to them.

See more at http://www.nicolaaskham.com/blog/2014/10/10/building-relationships-and-rapport

 

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